Quote of the Day:
mae west
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond. – Mae West

carrotsCarrots: The carrot is a root vegetable, usually orange in color, though purple, red, white, and yellow varieties exist. It has a crisp texture when fresh.

 

Benefits of Carrots

1. Improved Vision
2. Cancer Prevention
3. Anti-Aging
4. Healthy Glowing Skin (from the inside)
5. A Powerful Antiseptic
6. Beautiful Skin (from the outside)
7. Prevent Heart Disease
8. Cleanse the Body
9. Healthy Teeth and Gums
10. Prevent Stroke

Healthy Carrot Muffins

carrot_muffinsIngredients

3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
2/3 cup dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons wheat germ
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
Pinch fine salt
2 large eggs
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
4 medium carrots, grated (about 2 cups)
1/2 cup canned crushed pineapple, drained
Special equipment: 12 cup muffin tin and paper liners

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line twelve 1/2-cup muffin cups with paper muffin liners.

Whisk the flours with the brown sugar, wheat germ, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl. In another medium bowl lightly whisk the egg, then whisk in the vegetable oil, and vanilla extract.

Quickly and lightly fold the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients with a rubber spatula. Stir in the carrots and pineapple just until evenly moist; the batter will be very thick. Divide the batter evenly among the muffin cups. Bake until golden and a toothpick inserted in the centers comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Turn muffins out of the tins and cool on a rack. Serve warm.
celeriacCeleriac: Celeriac, also called turnip-rooted celery or knob celery, is a variety of celery cultivated for its edible roots, hypocotyl, and shoots. It is sometimes called celery root. It was mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey as selinon. 1 cup has 66 calories.

Maple-Bacon Roasted Apples and Celeriac

maple_bacon_celeriac

Ingredients

1 large celery root (celeriac), about 1 1/2 pounds, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 apples, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 slices bacon, chopped
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or rosemary or 1/4 teaspoon dried

Preparation

Preheat oven to 450°F.
Toss celery root with oil, pepper and salt and spread on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until starting to brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Add apples, toss gently and continue roasting until the apples and celery root are tender, 6 to 10 minutes more.
Meanwhile, cook bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just crispy. Remove to a paper-towel-lined plate with a slotted spoon; discard all but 2 teaspoons of the bacon fat. Add maple syrup to the fat in the pan and bring to a boil, scraping up the browned bits. Add the cooked bacon and thyme (or rosemary). When the celery root and apples are tender, gently toss them with the maple-bacon glaze and roast for about 5 minutes more.

Celery: Celery is a plant variety in the family Apiaceae, commonly used as a vegetable. The plant grows to 1 m tall. The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. 1 cup chopped celery = 16 calories.

Celery, Grapefruit and Olive Salad

celery-grapefruit-and-olive-saladIngredients

4 stalks celery and their leaves, chopped
1 red grapefruit, supremed, sections halved
1 green onion, finely chopped (greens only)
1/4 cup chopped black olives
2 tablespoons grapefruit juice
1/2 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Place the celery, celery leaves, grapefruit, green onions and olives in a medium bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the grapefruit juice and the sugar. Drizzle in the olive oil, whisking. Add salt and pepper to taste, and pour over the salad. Toss, taste and adjust with salt, if needed.

Recipe courtesy Melissa d’Arabian

clementineClementines: A clementine is a hybrid between a mandarin and a sweet orange, so named in 1902. The exterior is a deep orange color with a smooth, glossy appearance. Clementines can be separated into 7 to 14 segments.

 

Clementine Cake

clementine_cakeIngredients

4 to 5 clementines (about 1 pound total weight)
6 eggs
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
2 1/3 cups ground almonds
1 heaping teaspoon baking powder

Directions

Put the clementines in a pot with cold water to cover, bring to the boil, and cook for 2 hours. Drain and, when cool, cut each clementine in half and remove the seeds. Then finely chop the skins, pith, and fruit in the processor (or by hand, of course).

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Butter and line an 8-inch spring-form pan with parchment paper.

Beat the eggs. Add the sugar, almonds, and baking powder. Mix well, adding the chopped clementines. I don’t like using the processor for this, and frankly, you can’t balk at a little light stirring.

Pour the cake mixture into the prepared pan and bake for 1 hour, when a skewer will come out clean; you’ll probably have to cover the cake with foil after about 40 minutes to stop the top from burning. Remove from the oven and leave to cool, in the pan on a rack. When the cake is cold, you can take it out of the pan. I think this is better a day after it’s made, but I don’t complain about eating it anytime.

I’ve also made this with an equal weight of oranges and lemons, in which case I increase the sugar to 1 1/4 cups and slightly Anglicize it, too, by adding a glaze made of confectioners’ sugar mixed to a paste with lemon juice and a little water.

Recipe courtesy Nigella Lawson

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